REGULATIONS
FOR THE
UNIFORM AND DRESS
OF THE
ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,

J. Gideon, junr. Printer.

[NOTE: This is the complete text of a published General Order taken from the collections of the US Army Center of Military History to serve as an illustration of the types of detailed research materials generated during the Nineteenth Century. Scholars, soldiers and students should conduct the bulk of their work in the original records which have been retired to the custody of the National Archives and Records Administration. They may wish to begin, however, by consulting published unit histories, personal papers, and sets of General Orders held in various Army libraries such as the US Army Military History Institute or the US Military Academy. The Center's holdings for this period are limited essentially to a bound set of General Orders, published Annual Reports of the Secretary of War, and a few unit histories. Although printed, this particular General Order was issued bearing the handwritten signature of The Adjutant General. It is reproduced on the Internet with only minimal adjustments to meet the requirements of Hyptertext Markup Language.]

GENERAL ORDERS No. 36, HEAD QUARTERS OF THE ARMY

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE

Washington, June 21,1839

The following description of the DRESS of the Army of the United States is published for the information and guidance of all concerned, and is to be strictly conformed to by the Army. Colonels of regiments and corps will see that the uniform is worn by the officers, non-commissioned officers, and men of their respective corps; and general and other officers, not of the line of the army, and whose duty it is to inspect the troops, will notice every deviation from the prescribed dress, and oblige the individuals concerned to rectify the same forthwith. Every departure from the established dress will be considered as disobedience of orders, subjecting the conduct of individuals so offending to the decision and sentence of a court martial.

BY ORDER OF ALEXANDER MACOMB,

Major General, Commanding in Chief:

s/R[oger] Jones

Adj[utan]t Gen[era]l

UNIFORM, AND DRESS OF THE ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES.

1. The Major General Commanding the Army.

DRESS.

Coat—dark blue, double-breasted; two rows of buttons, eight in each row, at equal distances: the distance between the rows, four inches at top, and three at bottom; stand up collar, to meet and hook in front, and no higher than the chin; cuffs two and a half inches deep, to go round the sleeve, parallel with the lower edge, and to button with three small buttons at the under seam; pointed cross flaps to the skirts, with four buttons equally distributed; the skirts to reach to the bend of the knee, with buff kersimere turnbacks; the bottom of the skirts, not less than three and a half, nor more than five inches broad, with a gold embroidered star on buff cloth three and a half inches diameter by three inches, the longest point perpendicular at the connecting point of the buff on each skirt; two hip buttons, to range with the lower buttons on the breast: collar, cuffs, and facings, of buff cloth or kersimere; lining buff. The cuffs, collar, and cross flaps may, at the option of the General, be embroidered with the oak leaf in gold, in which ease the collar and cuffs will be of blue cloth instead of buff.

Epaulettes—gold, with solid crescent; device, three silver embroidered stars, one 11 inch in diameter, one 13 inch, and one l7 inch, placed on the strap, in a row longitudinally, and equi-distant; the largest star in the centre of the crescent, the smallest at the top; dead and bright gold bullion.

Buttons—gilt, convex, with spread eagle and stars, and plain border.

Hat—cocked without binding; fan or back part not more than eleven inches, nor less than nine inches; the front or cock not more than nine inches, nor less than eight inches; each corner, six inches; black ribbons on the two front sides.

Loop and cockade—black silk cockade; loop gold, eleven inches long, ornamented with a silver spread eagle; gold rays emanating from the eagle 21 inches, computing from the centre, terminating in 24 silver stars, plain or set with brilliants.

Tassels—gold, with worked hangers.

Plume—yellow swan feathers, drooping from an upright stem, feathered to the length of eight inches.

Cravat or stock—black silk.

Trousers—from the 1st of October to the 30th of April, dark blue cloth, with a buff or gold lace stripe down the outer seam, one and a half inch wide and welted at the edges; from the 1st of May to the 30th of September, plain white linen or cotton.

Boots—ankle or Jefferson.

Spur—yellow metal or gilt.

Sword and Scabbard—straight sword, gilt hilt, silver grip, brass or steel scabbard.

Sword-knot—gold cord with acorn end.

Sword-belt—Russian leather, with three stripes of gold embroidery; the carriages to be embroidered on both sides; the belt to be worn over the coat.

Plate—gilt, having the letters U. S. and a sprig of laurel on each side in silver.

Sash—buff, silk net, with silk bullion fringe ends; sash to go twice around the waist and to tie on the left hip. The sash may be made of silk and gold mixed, at the option of the general.

Gloves—buff or white.

UNDRESS.

Coat—plain, dark blue, standing collar, buttons same as full dress, with two in the centre and one at the termination of each fold; without the buff and turnbacks.

Epaulettes

Buttons

Hat

Loop and cockade

Tassels

Plume

Cravat or stock

Boots

Spurs

Sword and scabbard

Sword knot

Belt (black patent leather)

Plate

Sash

Gloves

The same as in DRESS uniform.

Trousers—the same as in DRESS uniform, but without the stripe.

Forage Cap—according to pattern in Clothing Bureau.

2. All other Majors General.

DRESS AND UNDRESS.

The same as for the major general commanding the army, excepting that the nine buttons on the breast of the coat are to be placed by threes.

Epaulettes—the same, excepting that there shall be two stars on the straps, instead of three.

Plume—the same form and materials, excepting that it will be black and white, the black tip half the length.

3. A Brigadier General.

DRESS AND UNDRESS.

The same as for a major general, excepting that the coat is to have ten buttons placed on the breast, in pairs.

Epaulettes—the same, excepting that there shall be one star on the straps, instead of two.

Plume—the same as to materials and form, excepting that it will be white and red, the white tip half the length.

Frock coat for general officers—blue cloth; two rows of buttons, placed according to rank, as on the dress coat; stand-up collar of dark blue velvet; cuffs also of blue velvet; lining, black silk, or blue cloth; pockets in the folds of the skirt, with one button at the hip and one at the end of each pocket; making only four buttons on the back and skirts of the coat.

4. Officers of the General Staff.

DRESS.

Officers of the general staff, having rank as such, and below the rank of generals, will wear a uniform coat corresponding with that of the generals, excepting that it will be single breasted, with a row of nine buttons placed at equal distances; the collar to be part buff; the buff to extend four inches on each side from the front; the rest of the collar blue; the cuffs also blue.

Epaulettes—according to rank, as hereafter described.

Buttons—gilt, convex, same as general officers.

Hat—cocked, the same as that for general officers.

Loop and cockade—same as that for generals, omitting the rays and stars; the eagle to be gilt instead of silver.

Tassels—gold.

Plume—swan feathers, the same as the general officers, with the distinction of colors to designate the departments of the staff, as hereafter described.

Sword-knot—gold lace strap, with gold bullion tassel.

Cravat or stock

Trousers

Boots

Spurs

Sword and steel scabbard

Plate

Gloves

Sash (red silk net work, silk bullion fringe ends)

Sword-belt—Russia leather, with two stripes of gold embroidery; carriages embroidered on one side only.

The same as for general officers.

UNDRESS.

Coat—as prescribed for DRESS; but without the buff, and turnbacks.

Trousers—as prescribed for DRESS; but without the stripe.

Epaulettes

Buttons

Hat

Loop and cockade

Tassels

Plume

Cravat or stock

Boots

Spurs

Sword and scabbard

Sword-knot

Belt (black patent leather)

Plate

Gloves

The same as in DRESS uniform.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

Frock coat for staff officers under the rank of general officers—dark blue cloth, single breasted, with stand up cloth collar; cloth cuffs; regulation button; one row of eight buttons on the breast; lining and buttons on the skirt same as general officers.

Cloak for general and staff officers—blue cloth, lined with buff, or blue.

Plumes for the different departments of the staff.

Adjutant general's—white.

Inspector general's—green.

Quartermaster's—light blue.

Subsistence—light blue and white, blue tip half the length.

Aides-de-camp, and officers attached to generals, the same plume as worn by their generals, only an inch shorter. These plumes to be of the same material and form as prescribed for the general-commanding-the army.

Aides-de-camp

May wear the uniform of the general staff, according to rank, or that of their corps, at their option, the plume being the distinctive mark

5. Pay Department.

Coat—dark blue cloth, double breasted; two rows of buttons, ten buttons in each row; the rows to commence at the collar and to run in right lines to the bottoms of the lapels; four inches apart at the top, and two and a half inches at the bottom; the buttons in each row to be equidistant; standing collar of blue cloth; skirts to be made after the fashion of a plain coat, and lined with blue cloth, with a button at each hip; one at the end of each fold, and one intermediate in each fold; the paymaster-general to have two gold embroidered button holes on each end of the collar; paymasters, one on each end

Buttons—same as for other officers of the general staff.

Hat—cocked, plain, of the same form and dimensions as prescribed for general officers; black button and black silk gimp loop formed like that of the general officers; no tassel or other ornament except the cockade and gilt eagle.

Sword—small sword, gilt hilt and mountings; black scabbard and belt; plate same as for general staff.

Sword-knot—gold.

Stock or cravat—black silk.

Gloves—white.

Boots—ankle or Jefferson.

Spurs—gilt.

Trousers—from the 1st of October to the 30th of April, dark blue cloth, from the 1st of May to the 30th September, white linen or cotton.

Frock coat and cloak—same as for other officers of the general staff, except the lining of the cloak, which will be blue.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

6. Medical Department.

Coat—same as for the Pay department, except that the collar will be of black velvet. Surgeon-general to have two gold embroidered button holes on each side of the collar; surgeons, one on each end; the collar of assistant surgeons to be without ornament.

Buttons

Hat, &c.

Sword, belt and plate

Sword knot

Stock or cravat

Gloves

Spurs

Boots

Frock coat and cloak

Same as for the Pay department.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

Trousers—from the 1st of October to the 30th of April, dark blue cloth with a black cloth stripe down the outer seam, one and a half inch wide; from the 1st of May to the 30th of September, white linen or cotton, plain.

7. Corps of Engineers.

Coat—dark blue, single breasted, one row of nine buttons placed at equal distances; stand-up collar of black velvet, gold embroidered wreath on each side, near the front, of laurel and palm, crossing each other at the bottom, encircling a star of gold embroidery; cuffs, according to design in Engineer department; the skirt plain; one button at each hip; one at the end of the skirt, and one intermediate, between the hip and skirt buttons.

Epautettes—gold, according to rank, as hereafter described.

Buttons—the same as now established.

Hat—the same as that described for the general officers.

Loop and cockade—same as for general staff.

Tassels—gold.

Plume—three black ostrich feathers.

Cravat or stock—black silk.

Trousers—from the 1st of October to the 30th of April, dark blue, with a black velvet stripe down the outer seam one and a half inch wide; from the 1st of May to the 30th of September, white linen or cotton, plain.

Boots

Spurs

Sword-knot

Sword-belt

Same as for general staff.

Sword—gilt hilt, black scabbard with gilt mountings.

Plate—gilt, according to pattern in Engineer department.

Frock coat and cloak—the same as for the general staff, excepting the button, which will be that of the corps; the cloak lined with blue.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

8. Military Academy.

Professors, Teachers, and their assistants, not in the line of the army, including the Sword-master:—

Coat—plain, blue cloth, with buttons of the corps of engineers.

Hat—round, with black cockade, and yellow eagle.

Sword and belt—like that prescribed for the Pay department.

Frock coat, cloak, and forage cap—Same as for engineers.

Chaplain.

Coat—plain, black cloth, with buttons of the corps of engineers.

Hat, sword and belt—same as above.

Frock coat, cloak, and forage cap—Same as for engineers.

Cadets.

According to patterns in the Engineer department.

9. Corps of Topographical Engineers.

Coat—dark blue cloth, double-breasted, two parallel rows of buttons, ten in each row, at equal distances; the distance between the rows four inches throughout, measuring from the centres or eyes of the buttons; standing collar, to meet with hooks and eyes, and to rise no higher than to permit the chin to turn freely over it; square cuff, three and one-fourth inches deep; slashed flap on the skirt, of dark blue cloth, seven and one-fourth inches long, and three and one-tenth inches wide at the upper and lower edges, with three large buttons, one at each point; two large buttons at the waist; the skirt to extend within three and a half inches of the bend of the knee; the collar, cuffs, and skirt facings or turn-backs, to be of dark blue velvet; the collar, cuffs, and slashed skirt flaps to be embroidered in gold, with oak leaves and acorns, according to the designs in the Topographical Bureau. Rank to be designated by galloons of gold lace, half an inch wide, placed diagonally and entirely across the upper side of the sleeve just above the cuff, and below the elbow, as follows, viz: For a second lieutenant, one galloon on each sleeve; for a first lieutenant, two galleons on each sleeve; for a captain, three galleons on each sleeve; for a field officer, four galloons on each sleeve.

Graduates of the Military Academy, attached to the corps, with the rank of second lieutenant by brevet, will not wear galloons, but in all other respects they will dress as the second lieutenants.

Epau1ettes—according to rank, as described hereafter; within the cresent, which will be solid and bright, a shield embroidered in gold, and below it the letters T.E. in old English characters; the letters to be of silver for all grades, except the majors, who will wear yellow letters, to form the contrast with their epaulette straps of silver lace. The spread eagle, of silver, to be worn by the colonel only, is to be placed upon the epaulette strap above the shield.

Buttons—gilt, seven-eighths of an inch diameter in the extreme, convex and solid; device, the shield of the United States, occupying one-half the diameter, and the letters T.E. in old English characters, occupying the other half; small buttons one-half inch diameter, device and form the same.

Hat, loop and cockade, tassels, stock or cravat, sword-knot, boots, gloves—the same as for officers of the general staff, except that the button in front of the hat will be that of the corps.

Plume—black, of the same form and materials as for the general staff.

Sash—crimson silk-net, with silk bullion fringe ends, to go twice round the waist, and to be tied on the right hip; the pendant part to extend uniformly one foot two inches below the tie.

Spurs—yellow metal, straight shank, to correspond with the design in the Topographical Bureau.

Trousers—from the 1st of October to the 30th of April, dark blue cloth, with a gold stripe down the outer seam for full dress, one and three-fourths inch wide, to correspond with the pattern in the Topographical Bureau; from the 1st of May until the 30th September, white linen or cotton, plain.

Sabre—of same form as that prescribed for the dragoons; fish-skin gripe, bound with yellow wire; gilt hilt, of half basket form; bright steel scabbard, to correspond with the pattern to be deposited in the Topographical Bureau.

Waist-belt—black, one and a half inch wide, like that of the dragoons.

Plate—gilt, eliptical, two inches in the shortest diameter; device, the eagle and shield of the United States, and the letters U.S. in old English characters underneath, with the words CORPS OF TOPOGRAPHICAL ENGINEERS, in small Roman capitals, around the edge of the plate.

Frock coat—same as for the general staff, except that the buttons will be those of the corps, and ten in front. With the frock coat, or for undress, the stripes on the trousers will be of black silk and worsted lace, with oak leaf and acorn figure, and one and three-fourth inch wide.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

Cloak—same as for the general staff, except the button; lining blue.

10. Artillery.

Coat—dark blue cloth, double breasted, two rows of buttons, ten in each row, at equal distances; the distance between the rows four inches at top, and two inches at bottom, measuring from the centres or eyes of the buttons; standing collar, to meet in front with hooks and eyes, and rise no higher than to permit the free turning of the chin over it; two loops, four and a half inches long, on each side of the collar, with one small uniform button at the end of each loop; the collar edged all round with red; plain round cuff, three inches deep; slashed flap on the sleeve, six and a half inches long, and two and two-eighths of an inch wide at the points, and two inches wide at the narrowest part of the curve; four loops and four small buttons on the slashed flap on the sleeve for field officers; for captains, a sleeve of the same pattern, but the slash only four and a half inches long, with three loops, and three small buttons; and for subalterns, a slash sleeve of three and a half inches long, with two loops, and two small buttons; loops to be placed at equal distances; slashed flap on the skirt, with four loops and large buttons; the slashed flaps on the sleeves and skirt to be edged with red on the ends and indented edge; two large buttons at the waist; skirt to extend to within three and a half inches of the bend of the knee; red kerseymere turnbacks and skirt linings; gold embroidered shell and flame at the bottom of the skirt; loops on the collar and flaps to be of gold lace, half an inch wide, and the entire loop not to exceed one and a quarter inch in breadth; the coat to be lined with red.

Epaulettes—according to rank and pattern, as hereafter described.

Buttons—gilt, convex; seven-eighths of an inch in diameter; device, a spread eagle with shield, bearing the letter A.

Cap—black beaver, seven and a half inches deep, with lackered sunk tip seven and a half inches diameter, with a band of black patent leather to encircle the bottom of the cap; black patent leather peak, gilt eagle, and cross cannons and number of regiment; a strap of black patent leather, fastened to each side of the cap, to be worn under the chin.

Plume—red cock feathers falling from an upright stem, eight inches long, with a gilt socket. Officers of the horse artillery will be allowed to wear a red horse-hair plume, instead of a cock-feather.

Trousers—from the 1st of October to the 30th of April, white and light blue mixture cloth, producing the effect of a sky-blue, to come well down over the boots, and made perfectly plain, except a red stripe down the outer seam, one and a half inch wide, and welted at the edges from the 1st of May to the 30th of September, white linen or cotton, without the stripe.

Boots—ankle or Jefferson.

8purs—(for mounted officers) yellow metal or gilt.

Sword and Scabbard—according to pattern furnished by the Ordnance department.

Sword-knot—crimson and gold, with bullion tassel.

Shoulder-belt—white leather, two and a half inches wide, with frog; to be worn over the coat, with a breast plate, according to pattern to be furnished by the Ordnance department. The colonel, lieutenant colonel, major, and adjutant of a regiment will wear a waist belt of the pattern now used.

Sash—crimson silk net, with silk bullion fringe ends; sash to go twice round the waist and to be tied on the left hip; the pendant part to be uniformly one foot in length from the tie.

Stock—black silk.

Gloves—white.

Frock coat—dark blue cloth, single breasted; with not less than eight nor more than ten (depending on the size of the officer) large regimental buttons down the front at equal distances, and two small regimental buttons at the fastening of the cuff; plain stand up collar; two large buttons at each pocket in the skirt, one of which at the hip, and the other at the bottom of the fold of the pocket, making four buttons behind; lining of the coat, blue.

Cloak—blue, lined with scarlet shalloon; walking length; clasp ornaments at bottom of collar, gilt eagle, with chain.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

11. Ordnance Department.

Coat—of the same pattern as the artillery; to be of dark blue cloth throughout; no red; lace, the same as the artillery.

Buttons—gilt, convex, plain border, cross cannon and bomb-shell.

Epaulettes—according to rank and pattern, as hereafter described.

Hat—cocked, and ornaments the same as the general staff.

Plume—the same as the artillery.

Trousers—of dark blue cloth, with stripe one and a half inch wide of the same material and color, welted at the edges; plain while linen or cotton for summer.

Boots

Spurs for mounted officers

Sword and scabbard

Waist-belt

Plate

Sword-knot

Sash

Stock

Gloves

Frock coat

Cloak

Same as for the artillery, except that the sword belt will be of black

patent leather, and worn round the waist.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

Ordnance sergeants to wear the uniform of the sergeant-major of artillery, except the aiguillette, and stripe of the cloth pantaloons, which will be dark blue instead of red. Ordnance men the same as the artillery, except the shoulder straps, which will be red.

12. Infantry.

Coat—the same pattern as that of the artillery; to be of dark blue cloth, lined with white serge; edged with white kerseymere where the artillery coat is edged with red; turnbacks and skirt lining of white kerseymere; skirt ornament silver embroidered bugle; the lace to be silver.

Epaulettes—according to rank and pattern, as hereafter described.

Buttons—same as at present worn.

Cap—same as the artillery, except the ornaments, which are a silver bugle, number of regiment, surmounted by a gilt eagle, as at present worn.

Plume—white cock-feathers, falling from an upright stem, eight inches long, with a gilt socket.

Trousers—the same as the artillery, except that the stripe on the mixture trousers to be of white kerseymere.

Boots

Spurs for mounted officers

Sword and scabbard

Sword-knot

Shoulder-belt and plate

Sash

Stock

Gloves

Same as for the artillery.

Frock coat—same as for the artillery, except the button, which will be the regimental button.

Cloak—same as for the artillery, except the lining, which will be white shalloon.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

13. Dragoons.

Coat—dark blue cloth, double-breasted, two rows of buttons, ten in each row, at equal distances, after the fashion of the coat described for the infantry; the lace gold; the collar, cuffs, and turnbacks, yellow, the skirt to be ornamented with a star instead of a bugle, and the length of the skirt to be what is called three-quarters; the slash flap on the skirt and sleeve to correspond with that of the infantry; the slash on the sleeve to designate rank in the same manner; the collar to be framed with lace, two loops on each side of the collar, with small uniform buttons at the back end of the loops.

Epaulettes—according to the established rule, where the button is yellow, and according to rank.

Button—gilt, convex, device, a spread eagle, with the letter D on the shield.

Trousers—for the company officers, blue grey mixture, of the same color as that for the infantry, with two stripes of yellow cloth, three-fourths of an inch wide, up each outward seam, leaving a light of 3 inch between.

For the colonel, lieutenant colonel, major, and adjutant, dark blue cloth, with two stripes of gold lace up each outward seam, three-fourths of an inch wide, leaving a light between. For the summer, all officers to wear plain white drilling.

Cap—of the same material as that for the infantry, but according to a pattern furnished; to be ornamented with a gilt star, silver eagle, and gold cord; the star to be worn in front, with a drooping white horse hair pompon; the field of ricers to have a small strip of red hair, to show in front of their pompons.

Boots—ankle.

Spurs—yellow metal.

Sabre—browned steel scabbard, half basket hilt, gilt, with two fluted bars on the outside, fish-skin gripe, bound with silver wire, and of the pattern deposited with the Ordnance department.

Sword-knot—gold cord, with acorn end.

Waist-belt—black patent leather, one and a half inch wide, with slings, hooks, and plate, like those of the general staff, omitting on the plate the letters U.S. and inserting the letter D within the wreath.

Sash—silk net, deep orange color, and like that of the infantry, as to shape and size; to be tied on the right hip; to be worn only when in full dress, and with the frock coat.

Stock—black silk.

Gloves—white.

Frock coat—dark blue cloth, cut after the fashion of that described for the artillery. Officers upon ordinary stable duty, marches, or active service, will be permitted to wear a shell or stable jacket, corresponding with that of the men, with gold lace trimmings.

Great coat—blue grey mixture, like that furnished the men, double-breasted, with sleeves, stand-up collar, cape to meet, and button all the way in front, and reach down to the upper edge of the cuff of the coat.

Forage cap—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

Horse Furniture, for Dragoons.

Housing—blue cloth, with gold lace border, for the field officers and commissioned staff, one and a half inch wide, and yellow cloth border of the same width, for company officers.

Bridle—black leather.

Mountings—all metallic mountings, stirrups, bits, &c., of saddle and bridle, to be of yellow metal.

Non-commissioned Officers, Buglers, and Privates of Dragoons.

Coat—dark blue cloth short coat, double-breasted, with yellow collar, cuffs, turnbacks, and brass shoulder-knots, of the exact cut and fashion of the one furnished the clothing bureau. Sergeants to wear chevrons of three bars, points towards the cuff, on each sleeve, above the elbow; corporals, two bars. The collar of the chief musicians' and sergeants' coats to be trimmed with yellow worsted binding, after the style of the officers. Musicians' coats to be of red cloth, yellow turnbacks and cuffs, yellow buttons

Trousers—same material as for other corps, but cut and made after the style and fashion of a pair furnished the clothing bureau. Sergeants to have two yellow stripes three-fourths of an inch wide, up each outward seam, leaving a light of 3 inch between. Corporals and privates one yellow stripe up each outward seam. The stripes to be in advance of the seam.

Jacket—blue cloth for winter, white cotton for summer; stand-up collar, trimmed with yellow worsted binding, like a sergeant's coat; single-breasted, one row of buttons in front. These jackets are to be made of cloth of the quality used for the old uniform coats.

Cap—same materials as for other corps; but the pattern, ornaments, and trimming, like the one furnished the clothing bureau; drooping white horse hair pompon.

Great coat—same materials as for other corps. Stand-up collar, double-breasted, cape to reach down to the cuff of the coat, and to button all the way up.

Boots—ankle.

Spurs—yellow metal.

The non-commissioned staff to wear aiguillettes on the left shoulder, like those for the artillery. Non-commissioned staff and first sergeants of companies wear yellow worsted sashes.

Forage cop—according to pattern in clothing bureau.

14. Civil Staff.

Commissary General of purchases, Military storekeepers, Ordnance storekeepers.

Coat—plain, of blue cloth.

Button—of the department to which the officers respectively belong; if to no particular arm, the general staff button.

Trousers—plain blue cloth for winter, and plain white linen or cotton for summer.

Round hat, black cockade, and yellow eagle.

Sword and belt—same as for Pay department.

Forage cap—same as worn by officers of the department.

Frock coat—same as the general staff; single breasted; button of department; without straps.

15. Badges to Distinguish Rank.

EPAULETTES.

Of general officers—as above described.

Of a colonel—bright bullion, half an inch diameter, three inches and a half long; plain lace strap, ornamented with an embroidered spread eagle; the number of the regiment to be embroidered within the crescent; crescent solid; eagle and number to be silver where the bullion is gold and gold where the bullion is silver.

Of a lieutenant colonel—the same as the colonel, omitting the eagle.

Of a major—the same as a lieutenant colonel as to shape and size; the strap to be of silver lace where the bullion is gold, and of gold lace where the bullion is silver; the number on the strap to correspond in color with the bullion, the border of the strap the same color of the bullion.

Of a captain—plain lace straps and solid crescent; bullion one-fourth inch diameter and two and a half inches deep; regimental number on the strap to be gold embroidered where the bullion is silver, and to be silver embroidered where the bullion is gold.

Of a lieutenant—the same as for a captain, except that the bullion is one-eighth inch in diameter.

The bullion of all epaulettes to correspond in color with the button of the coat.

All officers having military rank, to wear one epaulette on each shoulder.

The number on the strap of the epaulette being intended to denote the regiment, will he worn by regimental officers only.

Epaulettes may be worn either with pads or boxes.

AIGUILLETTES.

Staff officers, general as well as regimental, except the engineers, topographical engineers, and ordnance, will be distinguished by aiguillettes.

Aiguillettes of general staff officers—twisted gold cord, with gilt engraved tags, worn on the right shoulder, under the epaulette.

The general staff is to include—

Aiguillettes of regimental staff officers—twisted gold and silver cord, with gilt tags, worn under the epaulettes of the right shoulder.

SHOULDER STRAPS.

To be worn on the frock coats of general, general staff, artillery and infantry officers.

The Major General Commanding the Army—strap of blue cloth, one inch in breadth, and not less than three and a half inches nor more than four inches in length; bordered with an embroidery of gold a quarter of an inch wide; three silver embroidered stars of five rays, one star on the centre of the strap, and one on each side, equi-distant between the centre and outer edge of the strap. The centre star to be the largest; where these stars would come in contact with the embroidery of the strap, there must be described an arc of a circle, (having the centre of the star for its centre, and the radius of the star for its radius,) taking out a sufficient quantity of the embroider to admit them.

A Major General—the same as the Major General commanding the army, except that there will be two stars instead of three; the centre of each star to be one inch from the outer edge of the gold embroidery on the ends of the strap; both stars of the same size.

A Brigadier General—the same as a major general, except that there will be one star instead of two; the centre of the star to be equi-distant from the outer edge of the embroidery on the ends of the strap.

A Colonel—strap of the same size as above; the embroidery on the border to be one half the width (i. e. one eighth of an inch;) an embroidered spread eagle on the centre of the strap two inches between the tips of the wings, having in the right talon an olive branch, and in the left a bundle of arrows; an escutcheon on the breast as represented in the arms of the United States; the embroidery of the eagle to be of silver where the border is gold, and of gold where the border is silver.

A Lieutenant Colonel—the same as for a colonel, omitting the eagle, and introducing a leaf at each end, each leaf extending seven-eighths of an inch from the end border of the strap; the embroidered leaf of the same color with the border.

A Major—the same as that for a lieutenant colonel, except that the leaves will be of silver where the border is of gold, and of gold where the border is of silver.

A Captain—the same as that for a major, except that two embroidered bars will be substituted for each leaf, of the same width and color as the border; to be placed parallel to the ends of the strap; the distance between them and from the border equal to the width of the border.

A First Lieutenant—the same as for a captain, excepting that there will be one bar at each end instead of two.

A Second Lieutenant—the same as for a first lieutenant, omitting the bars.

Note.—The embroidery of the borders of the straps is, in every instance, to correspond in color to the button of the coat.

Shoulder straps for dragoons.

Formed like the strap of the epaulette, and made of blue cloth, edged with gold lace like an epaulette; solid gilt crescent, with the number of regiment embroidered within. The strap of the colonel to have on it a silver embroidered eagle; that of the lieutenant colonel two gold leaves at the points, where the crescent joins it; that of the major two silver leaves; that of the captain two gold bars; that of the first lieutenant one bar; that of the second lieutenant plain.

16. Horse Furniture for General and Staff Officers.

Housing for general officers—of dark blue cloth, trimmed with two rows of gold lace, the outer row one inch and five-eighths wide; the inner row two inches and a quarter; to be worn over the saddle; made full, so as to cover the horse's haunches, and fore-hands, and to bear certain embroidered ornaments, to denote the rank of the officer.

Surcingle—of blue web, to be attached to the housing. The same as the above for all staff officers holding the rank of general officers, according to their grade; if under that rank, they are to use the saddle-cloth prescribed for staff officers, to wit:

Saddle-cloth for staff officers—dark blue, of sufficient length to cover the saddle and holsters, and one foot ten inches in depth, with an edging of gold lace; the width of the lace one inch.

Bridle—of black leather; bent branch-bit, with gilt bosses; the front and roses yellow.

Collar—yellow.

Holsters—black leather, with gilt mountings.

Stirrups—gilt.

Officers of engineers and topographical engineers, the same as above, according to rank.

17. Horse Furniture for mounted officers of Artillery, Ordnance, and Infantry.

Saddle cloth—dark blue, two feet ten inches in length, and one foot ten inches in depth, with lace five-eighths of an inch in width; for the artillery and ordnance, gold lace; scarlet edging for the artillery; dark blue for the ordnance; for the infantry, silver lace and white edging.

Bridle—of black leather; gilt bits, stirrups, and mountings, for the artillery and ordnance, and plated for the infantry; front and roses for the artillery, red; for the ordnance, blue; for the infantry, white.

Collar—for the artillery, red; for the ordnance, blue; for the infantry, white.

Holsters—to be covered with black bear-skin, or leather.

18. General, and General Staff Officers.

The DRESS uniform of generals and general staff officers is to be worn at dress reviews, and on extraordinary occasions.

The UNDRESS is for general use, and may be worn on all occasions not specified above.

The blue frock coat may be worn by general officers on common occasions off parade, and when the troops are ordered to wear their great coats upon a march; to be worn buttoned, and hooked at the collar.

Officers of the staff may wear, under the same circumstances, the blue frock coat prescribed for them.

The sword-belt to be work over the frock coat.

The sash to be worn by general and staff officers, when in full dress, and on all occasions when serving with the troops, whether in undress or frock coat.

Colonels of regiments or corps, having the brevet rank of generals, may wear the uniform of their respective regiments or corps, or that of general officers according to their brevet rank, with the exception of the plume, which is to be worn only when commanding, according to their brevets. They will wear the plume of their respective corps.

All other brevet officers will wear the epaulettes distinctive of their highest rank according to their arm.

19. Officers of Artillery, Infantry, and Dragoons.

The sash is to be worn on all occasions where the officer is in full dress.

The frock coat may be worn as a common morning dress in quarters and on certain duties off parade; to wit: at drills—inspections of barracks and hospitals—courts of inquiry and boards—inspections of articles and necessaries—working parties and fatigue duties—and upon the march; on all such occasions to be buttoned, and hooked at the collar.

The sword-belt is to be worn over the frock coat, and when the officer is engaged on duty of any description, except that of the stable, the sash is to be worn.

The swords of mounted officers will be suspended from the belt, by slings of the same materials as the belt, with a hook attached to the belt, to suspend the sword more conveniently when on foot.

Officers of regiments and posts will be provided with Shell jackets, to be worn in summer, during the extreme heat of the season; the shell jacket to be of the following pattern:—white cotton or linen, with standing collar; cuffs two and a half inches deep round the wrist, to open at the lower seam; where they will be buttoned with two small uniform buttons. A row of nine small uniform buttons down the front at equal distances; the front and rear of the jacket to come down in a peak. A similar jacket of light blue cloth may be worn in campaign, or on fatigue duty.

The commanding officer will determine in orders, when the shell jacket is to be worn by the officers and men, according to the state of the weather. On duty, the sash will be worn with the shell jacket.

20. General Remarks.

The hair to be short, or what is generally termed cropped; the whiskers not to extend below the lower tip of the ear, and a line thence with the curve of the mouth; moustaches will not be worn by officers or men on any pretense whatever.

Vests are not described, as they form no part of the military dress. When worn, however, by general or general staff officers, they may be of buff, blue, or white, to suit season and climate, with the small uniform button, and made with standing military collar; for regimental officers, the same, with the exception of the buff.

The forage cap may be worn with the frock coat and with the shell jacket; in winter, the forage cap, in cold climates, will have a temporary band of black fur, two and a half inches wide, attached to the bottom, to unite in front by a tie of black ribbon.

Regimental officers, not serving with their regiments, nor doing duty in the line, may wear cocked hats of the same description as those prescribed for the general staff officers, except that the loop will be of black silk gimp, the eagle yellow, the tassels to conform to the color of the button.

Cocked hats may be either open or formed so as to shut like the hat, which has heretofore been designated chapeau de bras.

All officers are permitted to wear a blue plain coat, with the button designating their respective corps or stations, without any other mark on them; such a coat, however, is not to be considered as a dress for any military purpose whatever.

When not on military duty, black scabbards with gilt mountings may be worn by officers whose service scabbards are of metal.

21. Uniform of the non-commissioned officers, musicians, artificers, and privates, of the Artillery.

Sergeant major—the same as that established for the field officers, excepting that binding will be substituted for gold lace; the epaulettes to be of the same pattern as that of the subalterns, excepting that worsted bullion will be substituted for gold bullion; plume, red upright hackle, twelve inches long; aiguillette on the left shoulder, of yellow worsted, with gilt tags.

Quartermaster sergeant—the same as the sergeant major, excepting that the plume will be of light blue.

Chief musician—the same as quartermastersergeant, excepting that the coat will be of red cloth, with white linings and turnbacks; plume white.

Sergeants—coat to be of dark blue, single breasted, with one row of nine buttons, placed at equal distances; the skirts to extend within seven inches of the bend of the knee; the coat to conform to the pattern of the officers' coats in other respects, excepting that the cuff shall have three buttons and loops on the slash sleeve, to conform to that designated for a captain; the lace to be of worsted; two worsted epaulettes corresponding in pattern with those of a captain; first sergeant of companies to wear a red worsted sash; all sergeants to wear the red stripe on the blue mixture trousers, as designated for officers; same for the noncommissioned staff.

Corporals—same as sergeants, excepting that there will be but two buttons on the slash sleeve, conforming to the pattern of the sleeve for the subalterns; trousers same as sergeants, without the stripe; two epaulettes of the pattern for the subalterns, of the same materials as those of the sergeants.

Privates—the same as the corporals, excepting that instead of epaulettes, a strap will be worn on each shoulder, composed of the same materials and form of the epaulettes of the corporals, with pad, and half fringe.

Musicians—the same as the privates, excepting that the coat will be of red cloth, lined with white, turnbacks white; white plume, upright hackle, ten inches long.

The cap of the non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, to be of the same pattern as that designated for the officers.

The plumes of the sergeants, corporals, and privates, red worsted, eight inches long.

22. Uniform of the non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates of the Infantry.

The same as that for the artillery, excepting the facings and trimmings, which will be white; plume white.

23. Bands.

A band will wear the uniform of the regiment or corps to which it belongs.

The commanding officer may, at the expense of the corps, sanctioned by the council of administration, make such additions in ornaments as he may judge proper.

Note.—Non-commissioned officers and privates, as well as musicians, who shall have served faithfully for the term of five years, shall be permitted, as a mark of distinction, to wear a chevron on the sleeves of their coats, above the elbow, points up; and an additional chevron on each arm for every additional five years of faithful service. And those who served in the war, shall have the addition of a red stripe on each side of the chevron.