JOINT ARMY-NAVY RELEASE

HOLD FOR RELEASE
MORNING NEWSPAPERS
MONDAY, JANUARY 17, 1944

ARMY AND NAVY ADOPT NEW AIRCRAFT NAMING POLICY

A long-range policy for the naming of military aircraft, designed to insure uniformity, simplicity and meaning in the .names of American-built. warplanes being used by the U. S. services and by the United Nations, has been adopted by the Joint Aircraft Committee.

The Joint Aircraft Committee, on which the American and British military and naval services presently hold membership, recently was assigned the job of standardizing aircraft names. The work is being handled through a Sub-committee on Naming of Aircraft. One of the functions of the Joint Aircraft Committee is standardization on all matters pertaining to military aircraft.

At the same time that it announced the new naming policy, the Committee affirmed the currently-used popular names for warplanes, except in a few instances where conflict necessitated further discussions.

The Sub-committee on Naming of Aircraft, with offices in Room 1N88, Navy Department, Washington, D. C., will consider all applications for names of new aircraft. For the purpose of brevity, names submitted should consist of but one word, and superficially compounded names should be avoided.

Other terms of the new policy are:

Names will be assigned only to those types of aircraft which have reached the production stage and to those which have been previously procured and exist in considerable numbers.

Names recommended will not duplicate or permit confusion with names currently in use by the Army, Navy, Coast Guard or any Allies.

Each basic model of aircraft will retain the name originally assigned regardless of the manufacturer thereof or the operational uses to which it may subsequently be put. All aircraft in a given series within a basic type will retain the one name assigned; for example, P39A, B, C, D, -AIRACOERA, F4F, FM1, 2, 3 - WILDCAT.

In connection with some names currently in use, the British will continue to use names which differ from the U. S. names. This is necessary because the British use the popular names for warplanes in their official communications, and changes to conform with the U. S. name would necessitate extensive revision of British operational practices and communications.

Names adopted in the future will follow this scheme, as laid down by the Committee:

Fighters: Names indicating speed, maneuverability, fighting characteristics or aggressiveness.

Bombers: Names indicating size, weight, power, range or destructive characteristics.

Patrol Types: Names employing seafaring terms.

Transports: (Cargo and Personnel) Names implying transportation, range or load-carrying ability.

Trainers: Names employing tuition terms, educational institutions or places of training, but not names of military or naval establishments.

Miscellaneous: Names indicating the primary operational functions of the aircraft.

The names currently in use, as approved by the committee, are:

BOMBERS


Model


Original Designer

Army

Navy

Approved Name

Boeing

B-17


FORTRESS

Douglas

B-18


BOLO

Douglas

B-23


DRAGON

Consolidated

B-24

PB4Y

LIBERATOR

North American

B-25

PBJ

MITCHELL

Martin

B-26

JM

MARAUDER

Boeing

B-29


SUPERFORTRESS

Vega

B-34

PV

VENTURA

Douglas

A-20 (P-70)

BD

HAVOC (BOSTON)*

Douglas

A-24

SBD

DAUNTLESS

Curtis s

A-25

SB2C, SBW, and SBF

HELLDIVER

Lockheed

A-29

PBO

HUDSON

Martin

A-30


BALTIMORE

Vultee

A-31, A-35


VENGEANCE

Brewster

A-34

SB2A

BERMUDA

North American

A-36 (P-51)


MUSTANG

Grumman


TBF, TBM

AVENGER

Consolidated

OA-10

PBY, PB2B, and PBN

CATALINA

Consolidated


PB2Y

CORONADO

Martin


PBM

MARINER

FIGHTERS




Lockheed

P-38


LIGHTNING

Bell

P-39


AIRACOBRA

Curtis s

P-40


WARHAWK (KITTYHAWK)*

Republic

P-43


LANCER

Republic

P-47


THUNDERBOLT

North American

P-51 (A-36)


MUSTANG

Northrop

P-61


BLACK WIDOW

Douglas

P-70 (A-20)


HAVOC (BOSTON)*

Vought-Sikorsky


F4U, FG, and F2G, F3A

CORSAIR

Grumman


F6F

HELLCAT

Grumman


F4F, FM

WILDCAT

LIAISON

Taylorcraft

L-2 (O-57)


GRASSHOPPER

Aeronca

L-3 (O-58)


GRASSHOPPER

Piper

L-4 (O-59)

NE

GRASSHOPPER

Vultee

L-5 (O-62)

OY

SENTINEL

OBSERVATION

Vultee

O-49


VIGILANT

Curtiss

O-52


OWL

Lockheed

O-56 (B-34)


VENTURA

Taylorcraft

O-57 (L-2)


GRASSHOPPER

Aeronca

O-58 (L-3)


GRASSHOPPER

Piper

O-59 (L-4)


GPASSHOPPER

Vultee

O-62 (L-5)


SENTINEL

Curtiss


SO3C

SEAMEW

Vought-Sikorsky


OS2U, OS2N

KINGFISHER

TRAINERS

North American

AT-6

SNJ

TEXAN (HARVARD)*

Beech

AT-7

SNB

NAVIGATOR

Beech

AT-10


WICHITA

Beech

AT-11

SNB

KANSAN

Boeing

AT-15


CREWMAKER

North American

AT-16


HARVARD

Cessna

AT-17 (UC-78)

PBO

BOBCAT (CRANE)*

Lockheed

AT-18 (A-29)

PBO

HUDSON

Vultee

AT-19


RELIANT

Fairchild

AT-21


GUNNER

North American

BT-9,BT-14


YALE

Fleetwing

BT-12


SOPHOMORE

Stearman

PT-13, PT-17, PT-18, PT-27

N2S

CAYDET

Fairchild

PT-19, PT-23, PT-26


CORNELL

Ryan

PT-21,PT-22

NR

RECRUIT

Timm


N2T

TUTOR

Curtiss


SNC

FALCON

TRANSPORTS

Beech

C-43

GB

TRAVELLER

Beech

C-45

JRB

EXPEDITOR

Curtiss

C-46

R5C

COMMANDO

Douglas

C-47

R4D

SKYTRAIN (DAKOTA)*

Douglas

C-49, C-53

R4D

SKYTROOPER (DAKOTA)*

Douglas

C-54

R5D

SKYMASTER

Lockheed

C-56, C-60

R50

LODESTAR

Fairchild

UC-61

GK

FORWARDER (ARGUS)*

Howard


GH

NIGHTINGALE

Lockheed

C-63 (AT-18)


HUDSON

Curtiss

C-76


CARAVAN

Cessna

UC-78 (AT-17)

JRC

BOBCAT

Consolidated

C-87

RY

LIBERATOR

Vought-Sikorsky


JR2S

EXCALIBUR

Grumman

OA-9

JRF

GOOSE

Grumman


J4F

WIDGEON

* British name which will be retained.

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