Historical
Space Program Costs

(18 August 2011)

Notes: Inflation adjustments are provided via the Bureau of Labor Statistic's CPI Inflation Calculator (HERE).

NASA Historical Data Book: Volume III – Programs and Projects 1969-1978 – NASA SP-4012 (1985)
by Linda Neuman Ezell

Table 2-23.
Space Shuttle Funding History
(in thousands of dollars) [a]

Year

Request

Authorization

Programmed

1970

9,000 [b]

9,000 b

12,500

1971

110,000 [c]

160,000

78,500

1972

100,000

115,000

100,000

1973

200,000

200,000

198,575

1974

475,000

475,000

475,000

1975

800,000

805,000

797,500

1976

1,527,000

1,206,000

1,206,000

1977

1,288,100

1,288,100

1,413,100

1978

1,349,200

1,354,200

1,349,200

[a] Shuttle was funded as part of the spaceflight operations program through FY 1973.

[b] For a space station only.

[c] For Shuttle and station; $6,000,000 requested for station definition.

Table 2-24.
Space Shuttle-Orbiter Design and Development Funding History
(in thousands of dollars)

Year

Request

Authorization

Programmed

1970

---

---

8,300

1971

22,500 [a]

---

--- [b]

1972

42,000 [c]

---

15,000

1973

90,000

--- [d]

139,480

1974

377,100

377,100

363,125

1975

647,500

647,500

634,757

1976

1,108,200 [e]

877,300 [f]

867,335

1977

842,500

842,500

899,400 [g]

1978

690,500

695,500

813,060 [g]

a For airframe development.

b $47,000,000 was programmed for vehicle definition.

c For vehicle definition.

d Authorization figures were not broken down to include this category.

e Includes $230,900,000 for the transition quarter.

f Authorization figures do not include transition quarter funds.

g See also table 2-29 for orbiter production.

Table 2-25.
SSME Design and Development Funding History
(in thousands of dollars)

Year

Request

Authorization

Programmed

1970

---

---

4,200

1971

48,500

---

--- [a]

1972

58,000

---

45,100

1973

50,000

--- [b]

40,543

1974

55,500

55,500

82,307

1975

92,300

97,300

95,300

1976

171,500 [c]

135,500 [d]

140,800

1977

193,800

193,800

182,200 [e]

1978

219,900

219,900

197,400 [e]

a $20 900 000 was programmed for engine definition.

b Authorization figures were not broken down to include this category.

c Includes $36 000 000 for the transition quarter.

d Authorization figures do not include transition quarter funds.

e See also table 2-29 for main engine production.

Table 2-26.
STS SRB Design and Development Funding History
(in thousands of dollars)

Year

Request

Authorization

Programmed

1973

40,000 [a]

--- [b]

--- [c]

1974

18,100

18,100

8,567

1975

22,600

22,600

21,143

1976

94,200 [d]

76,200

82,240

1977

82,600

82,600

100,400

1978

80,000

83,600

104,998

a For definition studies and configuration selection, initiation of detailed design, and start of booster engine or rocket motor development.

b Authorization figures were not broken down to include this category.

c It was estimated in the FY 1973 budget estimate that $1,700,000 would be programmed in FY 1972; see also note a above.

d Includes $18,000,000 for the transition quarter.

e Authorization figures do not include transition quarter funds.

Table 2-27.
Shuttle- ET Design and Development Funding History
(in thousands of dollars)

Year

Request

Authorization

Programmed

1974

24,300

24,300

18,100

1975

26,000

26,000

34,000

1976

81,200 [a]

66,100 [b]

65,700

1977

64,000

64,000

84,000

1978

83,600

80,000

88,030

a Includes $15,100,000 for the transition quarter.

b Authorization figures do not include transition quarter funds.

NASA Historical Data Book: Volume V – NASA Launch Systems, Space Transportation, Human Spaceflight, and Space Science, 1979-1988 – NASA SP-4012 (1999)
by Judy A. Rumerman

Table 3-2 Programmed Budget by Budget Category
(in thousands of dollars)
(EXCERPTED TABLE)

Budget Category/Year

1979

1980

1981

Space Shuttle Program

1,638,300

1,871,000

1,995,000

Table 3-3. Orbiter Funding History
(in thousands of dollars)
(EXCERPTED TABLE)

Year (Fiscal)

Submission

Authorization

Appropriation

Programmed

1979

DDT&E 536,500
Production 397,000

DDT&E 536,500
Production a

b

DDT&E 727,800
Production 264,500

Suppl Appr.

c

61,500 d

e


1980

DDT&E 560,900 f
Production 572,600 g

DDT&E 420,800
Production 570,600

h

DDT&E 641,900
Production 572,600

Suppl Appr.

i

-- j

k


1981

DDT&E 521,000 l
Production 727,500 m

DDT&E 320,900
Production 768,200

DDT&E 521,000 n
Production 727,500 o

DDT&E 510,500
Production 779,000

a Undistributed. Total 1979 Production authorization = $458,000,000.

b Undistributed. Total 1979 R&D appropriation = $3,477,200,000.

c Supplemental appropriation submission of $185,000,000 undistributed among functions.

d Distribution for supplemental appropriation not specified in budget figures. Distribution indicated in supporting congressional committee documentation.

e Supplemental appropriation of $185,000,000 undistributed among functions.

f Amended budget submission. Original submission = $420,800,000.

g Amended budget submission. Original submission = $570,600,000.

h Undistributed. Total 1980 R&D appropriation = $4,091,086,000.

i Specific functions for supplemental appropriation not specified. Supporting committee documentation states that the administration requested additional funds for design, development, test, and evaluation of orbiter ($140,100,000), external tank ($11,000,000), solid rocket booster ($3,700,000), launch and landing ($45,200,000), and changes/systems upgrading ($100,000,000) for a total of $300,000,000.

j House committee introduced and passed supplemental appropriation for $300,000,000, but no further action was taken by the whole House. Senate committee authorized supplemental appropriation of $300,000,000, which was passed by the whole Senate. However, there was no conference committee authorization for a supplemental appropriation.

k Undistributed supplemental appropriation of $285,000,000 approved by conference committee and Congress.

l Amended budget submission. Original submission = $320,900,000. The increase reflects technical problems that delayed the scheduled rollout of the orbiter Columbia from the Orbiter Processing Facility and led to the delay in the Orbital Flight Test program and the initial operational capability date.

m Amended budget submission. Original submission = $768,200,000.

n Reflects recission.

o Reflects recission.

Combined Data from SP-4012 Volumes III and V:

Space Shuttle Program Funding
(Millions of Then-Year Dollars)

Year

STS
(Total)

STS
(Orbiter)

STS
(SSME)

STS
(SRB)

STS
(ET)

1970

$12.50

$8.30

$4.20

$0.00

$0.00

1971

$78.50

$47.00

$20.90

$0.00

$0.00

1972

$100.00

$15.00

$45.10

$0.00

$0.00

1973

$198.58

$139.48

$40.54

$1.70

$0.00

1974

$475.00

$363.13

$82.31

$8.57

$18.10

1975

$797.50

$634.76

$95.30

$21.14

$34.00

1976

$1,206.00

$867.34

$140.80

$82.24

$65.70

1977

$1,413.10

$899.40

$182.20

$100.40

$84.00

1978

$1,349.20

$813.06

$197.40

$105.00

$88.03

1979

$1,638.30

$992.30

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

1980

$1,871.00

$1,214.50

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

1981

$1,995.00

$1,289.50

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

Total

$11,134.68

$7,283.76

$808.75
(1970-78)

$319.05
(1970-78)

$289.83
(1970-78)

Space Shuttle Program Funding
(Millions of 2010 Dollars)

Year

STS
(Total)

STS
(Orbiter)

STS
(SSME)

STS
(SRB)

STS
(ET)

1970

$70.25

$46.65

$23.60

$0.00

$0.00

1971

$422.33

$252.86

$112.44

$0.00

$0.00

1972

$522.00

$78.30

$235.42

$0.00

$0.00

1973

$975.00

$684.85

$199.07

$8.35

$0.00

1974

$2,099.50

$1,605.01

$363.80

$37.87

$80.00

1975

$3,229.88

$2,570.77

$385.97

$85.63

$137.70

1976

$4,618.98

$3,321.89

$539.26

$314.98

$251.63

1977

$5,087.16

$3,237.84

$655.92

$361.44

$302.40

1978

$4,506.33

$2,715.62

$659.32

$350.69

$294.02

1979

$4,914.90

$2,796.90

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

1980

$4,958.15

$3,218.43

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

1981

$4,788.00

$3,094.80

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

Total

$36,192.48

$23,803.91

$3,174.8
(1970-78)

$1,158.95
(1970-78)

$1,065.75
(1970-78)

Chariots for Apollo – NASA SP-4205 (1979)
By Courtney G. Brooks, James M. Grimwood and Loyd S. Swenson, Jr

Data is from Appendix H; amount is in millions of dollars.

Program Area

FY63

FY64

FY65

FY66

FY67

FY68

FY69

TOTAL

Command & service modules

$345.00

$545.87

$577.83

$615.00

$560.40

$455.30

$346.00

$3,445.40

Lunar module

$123.10

$135.00

$242.60

$310.80

$472.50

$399.60

$326.00

$2,009.60

Guidance & navigation system

$32.40

$91.50

$81.04

$115.00

$76.65

$113.00

$43.90

$553.49

Integration, reliability, & checkout

$0.00

$60.70

$24.76

$34.40

$29.98

$66.60

$65.10

$281.54

Instrumentation & scientific equipment

$11.50

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$11.50

Operational support

$2.50

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$2.50

Supporting development

$3.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$3.00

Little Joe II development

$8.80

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$8.80

10 Saturn I launch vehicles

$90.86

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$90.86

Saturn I

$0.00

$187.08

$40.27

$0.80

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$228.15

Saturn IB

$0.00

$146.82

$262.69

$274.19

$236.60

$146.60

$41.35

$1,108.25

Saturn V

$0.00

$763.38

$964.92

$1,177.32

$1,135.60

$998.90

$534.45

$5,574.57

Engine development

$0.00

$166.00

$166.30

$134.10

$49.80

$18.70

$0.00

$534.90

Apollo mission support

$0.00

$133.10

$170.54

$210.39

$243.90

$296.80

$0.00

$1,054.73

Spacecraft support

$0.00

$0.00

$83.66

$95.40

$110.77

$60.50

$121.80

$472.13

Manned space flight operations

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

$546.40

$546.40

Totals for that Fiscal Year

$617.16

$2,229.45

$2,614.61

$2,967.40

$2,916.20

$2,556.00

$2,025.00

$15,925.82

The Man Who Ran the Moon: James E. Webb and the Secret History of Project Apollo (2006)
By Piers Bizony

The book describes how in 1961, the original cost projections for Apollo were $10 billion. Webb then said “Come on guys, you're doing this on the basis that everything's going to work every time, every place, no matter what you do.”
New cost projections came in at $13 billion. Webb then went onto the Hill and calmly informed Congress that Apollo would cost upwards of $20 billion.
When he was questioned about the figure back at NASA headquarters, Webb replied that he'd “put an administrator's discount on it”.
What's not described in the book is how the final cost according to NASA in 1973 was $25.4 billion.

- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -

Stages to SaturnNASA SP-4206
By NASA

AS-501 (Apollo 4) Costs in 1967:

$135 million for Saturn V AS-501 ($881.36 million in 2010)
$45 million for Apollo CSM ($293.78 million in 2010)

- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -

Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1965 – NASA SP-4006
By NASA

November 26 [1965]: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center announced that 48 additional J-2 liquid-hydrogen rocket engines would be purchased from Rocketdyne Div. of North American Aviation, Inc., under an amendment which converted the engine production contract to a cost-plus-incentive-award fee agreement. The initial contract was a cost-plus-fixed-fee agreement. Cost of amendment was $75.8 million which brought the total value of the contract to approximately $206 million. A total of 103 J-2 engines was now on order for the Saturn IB and Saturn V launch vehicle program.

(MSFC Release 65-289)

- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -

Astronautics and Aeronautics, 1966 – NASA SP-4007
By NASA

March 24 [1966]: NASA would negotiate two incentive-fee contracts totaling $315 million with Boeing Co. and North American Aviation, Inc., for procurement of additional Saturn V 1st (S-IC) stages and F-1 rocket engines: Boeing Co. would supply five S-IC stages, costing $165 million; North American Aviation, Inc., would handle production, support, and sustaining engineering of 33 F-1 engines for $150 million. (NASA Release 66-69; WSJ, 3/25/66, 10)

. . .

April 6 [1966]: MSFC had purchased 22 additional Saturn IB H-1 rocket engines from North American Aviation, Inc., under $7,634,742 modification to previous contract. In addition to the 205,000-lb.-thrust engines, which would complete engine requirements for Saturn IB/Apollo program, NAA would provide three years of support services. (MSFC Release 66-75)

- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- -

SATURN ILLUSTRATED CHRONOLOGY: Saturn's First Eleven Years: April 1957 through April 1968 (MHR-5)
By David S. Akens

On November 18 [1966] NASA approved F-1 engine contract NAS8-18734 CPIF. This contract provided for 30 F-1 engines needed in the Apollo program and continued production support and GSE through June 1970. These 30 F-1 rocket engines furnished by Rocketdyne Division of North American Aviation would complete the number of engines (106) required by the 15 scheduled Saturn V vehicles, plus spares. The cost would be about $141 million. The delivery of the 30 engines would begin in November, 1967, and continue through October 1968.

(MSFC Press Release No. 66-276, Nov. 17, 1966.)

. . .

MSFC announced also on June 30 [1967] the award by NASA of a $14,811,540 fixed-price-incentive-fee contract to North American Aviation for 60 additional H-1 rocket engines for use on first stages of uprated Saturn I vehicles. This order increased the total number of engines purchased to 322. Delivery would continue through September 1968.

(Paul Anderson, Contract NAS8-18741, Contracts Office, MSFC, June 30, 1967)

. . .

October [1967]: NASA announced on October 4 that in support of the Saturn V program it was purchasing nine additional S-IVB stages from the McDonnell Douglas Corporation for $146.5 million, fulfilling requirements for currently approved 15 Saturn V and 12 uprated Saturn I launch vehicles. Delivery would begin in April 1968 and end in May 1970.

- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -

Study of an Evolutionary Interim Earth Orbit Program (6 April 1971)
By NASA Advanced Concepts and Missions Division

Restarting Saturn IB Production: $70 million ($376.89 million in 2010 Dollars)
Restarting S-IVB Production: $30 million ($161.52 million in 2010 Dollars)
Restarting S-IC/S-II Production (for INT-21): $130 million ($699.93 million in 2010 Dollars)
Restarting Apollo CSM Production: $100 million ($538.41 million in 2010 Dollars)
Saturn IB Costs: $50 million ($269.20 million in 2010 Dollars)
Saturn INT-21 Costs: $80 million ($430.73 million in 2010 Dollars)
Apollo CSM Costs: $45 million ($242.28 million in 2010 Dollars)
Manned Spaceflight Costs: $500-600~ million annually ($2.69 to $3.23 billion in 2010 Dollars) to run Houston, KSC and MSFN/DSN with several launches each year.

- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -

Apollo 15 Press Kit (1971)
By NASA

Saturn V: $185 million ($966 million in 2010 Dollars)
Apollo CSM: $65 million ($350 million in 2010 Dollars)
Apollo LEM: $50 million ($267 million in 2010 Dollars)
Operations: $105 million ($565 million in 2010 Dollars)
Science Payload: $40 million ($215 million in 2010 Dollars)

- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -

Nuclear Shuttle System Definition Study, Phase III Final Report – Volume I Executive Summary (May 1971)
By McDonnell Douglas Astronautics

Note: Costs are given in GFY 1971 dollars in the original document.

Space Shuttle Operational Cost Per Launch: $5 million ($26.92 million in 2010 Dollars).
Saturn INT-21 Cost: $95 million ($511.49 million in 2010 Dollars)
Saturn INT-21 Launch Cost: $12 million ($64.61 million in 2010 Dollars)
Saturn INT-21 Total Cost: $107 million ($576.1 million in 2010 Dollars)

- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -

“NASA Recommendations” (31 January 1977)
By Carter Mondale Transition Planning Group

Space Shuttle Cost Per Launch: $13 million in 1976 dollars ($49.82 million in 2010 Dollars).

- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -

Near Term Intermediate Launch Vehicle: Low Cost S-IVB Stages – Case 103-8 (18 March 1969)
By Bellcomm, Inc and C. Bendersky

Saturn IB Costs from 1965 based on an order of 30 vehicles at 6 per year. Final cost does not include transportation or launch costs.

S-IB Stage: $6.28 million ($43.47 million in 2010 Dollars)
S-IVB Stage: $5.98 million ($41.4 million in 2010 Dollars)
Instrument Unit: $3.49 million ($24.16 million in 2010 Dollars)
Government Supervision and GSE: $2.25 million ($15.58 million in 2010 Dollars)
Total Cost Per Saturn IB: $18 million ($124.6 million in 2010 Dollars)
$/lb to Orbit (42,000 lb payload): $429/lb ($2,969/lb in 2010 dollars)

Saturn Derivative Costs (Based on buys of two INTermediate vehicles each year alongside two Saturn V's).

Saturn IB with 120” Solids: $50 million recurring cost ($297 FY10) + $67 million non-recurring costs, 78 klb to 100 n.mi ($3,807/lb in FY10)
156” SRM + S-IVB: $46 million recurring cost ($273.31 FY10) + $162 million non-recurring costs, 108 klb to 100 n.mi ($2,530/lb in FY10)
260” SRM + S-IVB: $41 million recurring cost ($243.6 FY10) + $183 million non-recurring costs, 95 klb to 100 n.mi ($2,564/lb in FY10)
S-IC + S-IVB: $69 million recurring cost ($409.97 FY10) + $31 million non-recurring costs, 132 klb to 100 n.mi ($3,105/lb in FY10)

They were very confident of getting launch costs in the range of $200 to $260 per pound; which translates to about $1,253 to $1,629 per pound in 2010 dollars, if a low cost S-IVB were developed. In fact, there was a cost estimate by the Aerospace Corporation which estimated $260/lb to LEO on the basis of a 15-vehicle buy of the 260” SRM + S-IVB configuration, and a launch rate of five a year.

Changes for the low cost S-IVB would have likely been:

- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -

Final Report – Studies of Improved Saturn V Vehicles and Intermediate Payload Vehicles (P-115) Summary (7 October 1966)
By Boeing Company, Space Division

(Cost Graph from within this report)

(I have combined some costs to provide a rough ballpark figure for each one; you should check the report for more details.)

S-IC / S-IVB (INT-20) and S-IC / S-II (INT-21) Families

Notes: INT-20/21 costs were based on six launches a year for five years, next to six Saturn V launches a year during that period. Also, there is a single cost of DDT&E to implement all eight engine configurations possible across the INT-20/21 family.

Facility changes at KSC alone would have been an additional mobile launcher, mobile service structure, and firing room upgrades to maintain the 6 x INT + 6 x SAT-V launch rate a year.

DDT&E: $164~ million ($1.1 billion in 2010)
R&D Flight Tests: $60.8 million (one test for INT-20 under MSFC ground rules regarding man-rating) ($409.19m in 2010)
INT-20 Unit Cost: $60.5 million ($407m in 2010)
INT-21 Unit Cost: $74.6 million ($502m in 2010)
First Delivery: If Authority to Proceed was given in January 1968, the first vehicle would be AS-516 in February 1970; 25 months later.)
Total Program Cost: $2 to $2.4 billion (depending on what mixture of INT-20/21 are procured over the 30-vehicle run) ($13-16.15 Billion in 2010)

SAT-V-3B

Notes: SAT-V-3B costs are based on six launches a year, next to six launches a year of a Saturn IB using the new MS-IVB-3B stage developed for this vehicle. All three stages are lengthened (MS-IC-3B by 20 feet; MS-II-3B by 15.5 feet, and MS-IVB-3B by 16.5 feet); and use advanced engines (5 x F-1A, 7 x 400 klbf toroidal aerospike and 1 x 400 klbf toroidal aerospike).

Performance is 367,400 lbf to 100 n.mi. for two stage, and 160,000 lb to TLI for three stage.

Facility Changes would have been:

SAT-V-3B scheduling and timing is based around the assumption that almost four years will be required for the 400 klbf toroidal aerospike LH2 engine to be successfully developed.

DDT&E: $1,097.6 million ($7.3 billion in 2010)
R&D Flight Tests:
$325.6 million (two launches) ($2.19 billion in 2010)
Unit Cost: $116.7 million (2-stage) ($785.4m in 2010) $139 million (3-Stage) ($935.49m in 2010)
First Delivery: If Authority to Proceed was given in January 1968, the first vehicle would be AS-537 in September 1973; 69 months later.)
Total Program Cost: $5.26 Billion based on a 30-vehicle run. ($35.4 billion in 2010)

SAT-V-23(L)

Notes: The first and third stages are lengthened (MS-IC-24(L) by 20 feet and MS-IVB-24(L) by 16.5 feet); and four 260” diameter liquid rocket boosters (LRBs) are attached to the core, each booster having two F-1 engines. Engines are standard F-1 and J-2. There was an alternate study, the SAT-V-24(L) which used F-1As, but it couldn't fit within the VAB's height limit.

Performance is 579,300 lbf to 100 n.mi. for two stage, and 220,200 lb to TLI for three stage.

Facility Changes would have been:

SAT-V-23(L) scheduling and timing is based around the LRB facilities and testing.

DDT&E: $944.9 million ($6.36b in 2010)
R&D Flight Test Vehicles:
$413.6 million (two launches) ($2.78b in 2010)
Unit Cost: $142.5 million (2-stage) ($959m in 2010) ($163.8 million (3-Stage) ($1.1b in 2010)
First Delivery: If Authority to Proceed was given in January 1968, the first vehicle would be AS-535 in May 1973; 64.9 months later.)
Total Program Cost: $5.86 Billion based on a 30-vehicle run. ($39.43b in 2010)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

A Study of Saturn V and Intermediate Vehicle Improvement Programs: Executive Summary Report
NASA TM X-53723 (16 April 1968)
by Robert Davies, NASA Advanced Systems Office, MSFC

(I have combined some costs to provide a rough ballpark figure for each one; you should check the report for more details.)

10 Year Production Run at Six Per Year Launch Rate

SAT-INT-17

DDT&E: $151.5 million
R&D Flight Test: $226 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $108 million
Total Program Cost: $7,142.5 million
Availability from ATP: 70 months

SAT-INT-18.5

DDT&E: $245.9 million
R&D Flight Test: $219 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $109 million
Total Program Cost: $7,009.9 million
Availability from ATP: 24 months

SAT-INT-18.7

DDT&E: $250 million
R&D Flight Test: $221 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $110 million
Total Program Cost: $7,081 million
Availability from ATP: 24 months

SAT-INT-20

DDT&E: $157.5 million
R&D Flight Test: $178 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $89 million
Total Program Cost: $5,656.5 million
Availability from ATP: 24 months

SAT-INT-21

DDT&E: $163.9 million
R&D Flight Test: $235 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $117 million
Total Program Cost: $7,440.9 million
Availability from ATP: 24 months

SAT-V-3B

DDT&E: $1,097.6 million
R&D Flight Test: $299 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $150 million
Total Program Cost: $10,376 million
Availability from ATP: 70 months

SAT-V-4(S)B

DDT&E: $431.6 million
R&D Flight Test: $312 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $156 million
Total Program Cost: $10,117 million
Availability from ATP: 42 months

SAT-V-25(S)

DDT&E: $603.1 million
R&D Flight Test: $322 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $161 million
Total Program Cost: $10,606 million
Availability from ATP: 43 months

SAT-V-23(L)

DDT&E: $944.9 million
R&D Flight Test: $390 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $195 million
Total Program Cost: $13,054 million
Availability from ATP: 64 months

10 Year Production Run at Two Per Year Launch Rate

SAT-INT-17

DDT&E: $151.5 million
R&D Flight Test: $337 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $168 million
Total Program Cost: $3,855.5 million
Availability from ATP: 70 months

SAT-INT-18.5

DDT&E: $245.9 million
R&D Flight Test: $403 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $202 million
Total Program Cost: $4,433 million
Availability from ATP: 24 months

SAT-INT-18.7

DDT&E: $250 million
R&D Flight Test: $405 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $204 million
Total Program Cost: $4,457 million
Availability from ATP: 24 months

SAT-INT-20

DDT&E: $157.5 million
R&D Flight Test: $351 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $175 million
Total Program Cost: $3,860 million
Availability from ATP: 24 months

SAT-INT-21

DDT&E: $163.9 million
R&D Flight Test: $415 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $208 million
Total Program Cost: $4,569 million
Availability from ATP: 24 months

SAT-V-3B

DDT&E: $1,097.6 million
R&D Flight Test: $545 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $273 million
Total Program Cost: $7,098.6 million
Availability from ATP: 70 months

SAT-V-4(S)B

DDT&E: $431.6 million
R&D Flight Test: $582 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $291 million
Total Program Cost: $6,835.6 million
Availability from ATP: 42 months

SAT-V-25(S)

DDT&E: $603.1 million
R&D Flight Test: $611 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $306 million
Total Program Cost: $6,109 million
Availability from ATP: 43 months

SAT-V-23(L)

DDT&E: $944.9 million
R&D Flight Test: $652 million (two launches)
Average Operational Launch Cost: $326 million
Total Program Cost: $8,117.9 million
Availability from ATP: 64 months