Cuban Missile Crisis
Order of Battle
Version 0.2
|(Created 26 August 2010
Updated 15 September 2014)

Sources/Bibliography:

DEFCON 2 by Norman Polmar
Strategic Air Command: People, Aircraft, and Missiles (2nd Edition) by Norman Polmar and Timothy M. Laur, 1990
Russian Strategic Nuclear Forces by Bukharin, Podvig, von Hippel, Kadyshev, Miasnikov, Sutyagin, Tarasenko, and Zhelezov
The Air Force Response to the Cuban Crisis. USAF Historical Division, Declassified.
The Naval Quarantine of Cuba. NHHC (Link)
Cuban Crisis 1962 ORBATs and OPLANs by Matt Wiser and Tom Cooper (Link)
Individual SSBN pages on Wikipedia and DANFS.

United States Strategic Forces

Strategic Air Command (SAC) Alert Status 25 October 1962 via JCS telegram to State (Link)

61 x B-52s on 1/8th Airborne Alert
304 x B-52s on Ground Alert
183 x B-47s Dispersed to Airfields in Non-Alert Status
340 x B-47s on Ground Alert
6 x B-58s on Ground Alert
93 x Atlas on Alert
46 x Titan on Alert

USAF Total Numbers as of 30 September 1962 (USAF Statistical Digest, FY1963 – 14.2 MB PDF)

Strategic Aircraft
48 x Squadrons, B-47 (720 Authorized, 789 On Hand, 664 Ready) (Strategic Bombardment)
6 x Squadrons EB-47 (90 Authorized, 88 On Hand, 78 Ready) (Strategic Bombardment)
42 x Squadrons B-52 (630 Authorized, 570 on Hand, 511 Ready) (Strategic Bombardment)
6 x Squadrons B-58 (80 Authorized, 77 On Hand, 30 Ready) (Strategic Bombardment)
3 x Squadrons EB/RB-47 (45 Authorized, 51 On Hand, 32 Ready) (Strategic Reconnaissance, Medium)
Note: SAC accepted 5 x B-52H in October 1962, ending B-52 production; and 6 x B-58A in October 1962, ending B-58A production.
Strategic Missiles
6 x Squadrons SM-68A Titan I (59 Authorized, 53 On Hand, 37 Ready, 16 Emerg. Combat Cap.)
4 x Squadrons SM-65D Atlas (35 Auth, 30 On Hand, 19 Ready, 11 Emerg. Combat Cap.)
3 x Squadrons SM-65E Atlas (30 Auth, 27 On Hand, 20 Ready, 7 Emerg. Combat Cap.)
5 x Squadrons SM-65F Atlas (78 Auth, 50 On Hand, 35 Ready, 15 Emerg. Combat Cap.) NOTE: 6 Sqd. Auth, but only 5 equipped.
505 x GAM-72A Quail in Inventory (433 x Operational with Combat Units)
225 x GAM-77 Hound Dog in Inventory (199 x Operational with Combat Units)
291 x GAM-77A Hound Dog in Inventory (261 x Operational with Combat Units)
18 x Minuteman in Inventory (15 in Test & Test Support, achieved limited IOC during CMC)
Air Defense Aircraft
17 x Squadrons F-101B/F (312 Auth, 284 On Hand, 214 Ready) (Fighter Interceptor)
23 x Squadrons F/TF-102 (592 Auth, 528 On Hand, 424 Ready) (Fighter Interceptor)
14 x Squadrons F-106A/B (264 Auth, 245 On Hand, 183 Ready) (Fighter Interceptor)
Air Defense Missiles
4 x Squadrons IM-99A BOMARC (209 Authorized, 194 On Hand, 168 Ready)
3 x Squadrons IM-99B BOMARC (194 Authorized, 139 On Hand, 127 Ready)
Tactical Aircraft
3 x Squadrons B-57 (48 Authorized, 48 On Hand, 41 Ready) (Tactical Bombardment)
10 x Squadrons F-84F (222 Authorized, 176 On Hand, 124 Ready) (Tactical Fighter)
35 x Squadrons F-100C/D/F (735 Authorized, 760 On Hand, 574 Ready) (Tactical Fighter)
3 x Squadrons F-101A/C (66 Authorized, 63 On Hand, 47 Ready) (Tactical Fighter)
3 x Squadrons F-104C/D (54 Authorized, 52 On Hand, 29 Ready) (Tactical Fighter)
17 x Squadrons F-105B/D (369 Authorized, 176 On Hand, 112 Ready) (Tactical Fighter)
8 x Squadrons B/RB/WB-66 (111 Authorized, 111 On Hand, 84 Ready) (Tactical Reconnaissance)
6 x Squadrons RF-101A/C (128 Authorized, 119 On Hand, 88 Ready) (Tactical Reconnaissance)
Tactical Missiles
62 x TM-61C Matador in Inventory (18 x Operational)
16 x TM-76 Mace in Inventory (10 x Operational)
5 x Squadrons TM-76A Mace (88 Authorized, 51 On Hand, 48 Ready)
3 x Squadrons TM-76B Mace (54 Authorized, 12 On Hand, 12 Ready)
Combat Support Forces
26 x Squadrons KC-97 (520 Authorized, 541 On Hand, 471 Ready)
32 x Squadrons KC-135 (495 Authorized, 479 On Hand, 444 Ready)
6 x Squadrons KB-50 (120 Authorized, 107 On Hand, 88 Ready)

Europe (TAC/US Navy) Alert Status 25 October 1962 via JCS telegram to State (Link)

27 x F-100 on Alert
9 x F-101 on Alert
15 x F-105 on Alert
2 x ASD/A3J on Alert
4 x A4D/FJ-4 on Alert
4 x AD on Alert
3 x Valiant on Alert
10 x F-84F on Alert
4 x Canberra on Alert
37 x Jupiter on Alert
48 x MGM-13 Mace “A” on Alert

POLARIS Force Alert Status 25 October 1962 via JCS telegram to State (Link)

NOTES: Overall reliability of Polaris A-1 was 50% (optimistic) 12.5% (pessimistic). This was due to the A-1 missile itself having a 50% reliability rate, while the W47Y1 warhead was estimated to have a 50% chance of initiating correctly. During 1966 tests; the W47Y1 fizzled/dudded three times out of four. The Polaris A-1 had a range of 1,200 nautical miles with the 600 kt W47Y1; while the Polaris A-2 had a 1,500 nautical mile range.

SUBRON 14 based at Holy Loch, Scotland had 112 x Polaris on Alert – out of a possible total of 144, with the following boats available/assigned to it:

SSBN-598 George Washington (SCB-180A George Washington) – 16 x Polaris A-1
SSBN-599 Patrick Henry (SCB-180A George Washington) – 16 x Polaris A-1
SSBN-600 Theodore Roosevelt (SCB-180A George Washington) – 16 x Polaris A-1
SSBN-601 Robert E. Lee (SCB-180A George Washington) – 16 x Polaris A-1
SSBN-602 Abraham Lincoln (SCB-180A George Washington) – 16 x Polaris A-1
Notes: During the CMC, SSBN-602 was in the middle of a scheduled 4 week yard period when she received orders to deploy, and did so.
SSBN-608 Ethan Allen (SCB-180 Ethan Allen) – 16 x Polaris A-2
Notes: Conducted first successful submerged launch of Polaris A-2 on 23 October 1961, and fired the first (and only) US SLBM warshot on 6 May 1962 with a Polaris A-2 with W47W1 warhead. She also began the first deterrence patrol with the A-2 on 26 June 1962.
SSBN-609 Sam Houston (SCB-180 Ethan Allen) – 16 x Polaris A-2 (at sea)
Notes: Departed Charleston, SC on 10 October 1962 for deterrence patrol with Polaris A-2 loadout.
SSBN-610 Thomas A. Edison (SCB-180 Ethan Allen) – 16 x Polaris A-2 (in port)
Notes: During the CMC, she was in port at Charleston, SC being prepared for an operational Polaris A-2 patrol. She left on 7 November 1962.
SSBN-611 John Marshall (SCB-180 Ethan Allen) – 16 x Polaris A-2 (in port)
Notes: During her shakedown cruise, SSBN-611 launched two Polaris A-2s off Cape Canaveral on 12 July 1962. Her first deterrence patrol did not begin until 31 December 1962 with Polaris A-2.

Pacific (TAC/US Navy) Alert Status 25 October 1962 via JCS telegram to State (Link)

11 x B-57 on Alert
50 x F-100 on Alert
5 x A3D on Alert (is spelled ASD on paper – Typo?)
16 x A4Ds on Alert
8 x AD-6 and AD-7s on Alert
Pacific Land-Based Guided Missiles (16 x Mace on Alert)
At this point in time, one unit in the Pacific had the Mace:
498th Tactical Missile Group, (Kadena AFB Okinawa) with semi-hardened launch positions.
Earlier that year, the 58th Tactical Missile Group (South Korea) had stood down in March 1962.
Pacific Sea-Based Guided Missiles (4 x Regulus on Alert)
During this period of time, the US Navy concentrated it’s SLBM force in the Atlantic, while the Regulus guided missile submarines (SSG/SSGN) carried out deterrence patrols in the Pacific.
SSG-282 Tunny
SSG-317 Barbero
SSGN-587 Halibut (SCB-237A)
SSG-574 Grayback (Off of Kamchatka Peninsula during Crisis)
SSG-577 Growler

Continental Air Defense Command (CONAD)

1,044 aircraft in air defense duties total.

On 26 October they broke down as:

598 on 5-15 minute alert
446 on 1-3 hour alert

The Florida CONAD force was 154 aircraft broken down as:

26 on 5 minute alert
35 on 15 minute alert
55 on 1-3 hour alert
4 to 11 aircraft were airborne continuously around the Florida Peninsula.

Soviet Union Strategic Forces

Long Range Aviation

58 x 3M BISON-Bs with 116 gravity bombs
45 Tu-95 BEAR-As with 90 gravity bombs
57 Tu-95K BEAR-Bs with 57 Kh-20 SSMs with range of 205 to 325 nm (see Note)

LRA Total: 160 bombers with 206 gravity bombs and 57 KH-20s.

Note: Arming a Tu-95K with a Kh-20 requires between 4 and 22 hours.

Soviet Navy:

6 x Pr V-611 ZULU IV/V SSB with 12 R-11FM (2 each boat), 10 kt or 500 kt warhead; 80 nm range.
3 x Pr 629 GOLF SSB with 9 R-11FM (3 each boat), 10 kt or 500 kt warhead; 80 nm range.
19 x Pr 629 GOLF SSB with 57 R-13 (3 each boat), 1 MT warhead; 325 nm range
1 x Pr 629B GOLF SSB with 2 R-21 (2 each boat) 1 MT or 800 kt warhead; 755 nm range
8 x Pr 658 HOTEL SSB with 24 R-11M (3 each boat), 10 kt or 500 kt warhead; 80 nm range.

Totals: 104 SLBMs on 37 boats

Strategic Rocket Forces (RSVN)

6 x R-7/R-7A with 5 or 3 MT warhead, 4,320 nm (R-7) or 6,480 nm (R-7A) range
32 x R-16 with 5, 3 or 6 MT warhead; 5,940 to 7,020 nm range

Totals: 38 ICBMs.

United States Navy Forces Near Cuba

CTG 81.5 Bermuda ASW Group

VP-49 (11 x P5M Marlins)
VP-45 (11 x P5M Marlins)

CTG 81.7 Caribbean ASW Group

VP-5 (11 x P2V Neptunes)

CTG 136.1 Surface Blockade/Quarantine Group

CAG-2 Canberra – Flagship
CA-148 Newport News
DLG-4 Dewey
DLG-8 MacDonough
DDG-4 Lawrence
DDG-11 Sellers
DDR-879 Leary
DDR-863
Steinaker
EDD-848 Witek
DD-775 Keith
DD-753 Pierce
DD-707 Soley
DD-704 Borie
DD-942 Bigelow
DD-763 Lawe
DD-710 Gearing
DD-872 Royal

CTG 136.2 Essex Group

CVS-9 Essex with CVSG-60

VS-34 (12 x S2F Trackers)
VS-39 (12 x S2F Trackers)
HS-9 (14 x HSS-2 Sea Kings)
VAW-12 Det 9 (1 x WF-2 Tracer)

USS Blandy (DD 943)
USS
Keppler (DD 765)
USS
Sperry (DD 697)
USS
Barry (DD 933)

CTG 136.3 Logistic Support

USS Elkomin (AO-55)
USS Kaskaskia (AO-27)
USS Great Sitkin (AE-17)
USS Joseph P. Kennedy (DD-850)
USS Weeks (DD-701)

Task Force 135

CVG-6

CVAN-65 Enterprise

CVG-7

CVA-62 Independence

NAS Key West status 25 October 1962 via JCS telegram to State (Link)

MAG (10 x F3H)
MAG (4 x F8U Crusader)
VFAW-3 (8 x F4D Skyray)
VF-41 (14 x F4H Phantom II)

U.S.A.F. Forces Near Cuba (25 October 1962)

NAS Key West status 25 October 1962 via JCS telegram to State (Link)

479th TFW (30 x F-104)

Homestead AFB status 25 October 1962 via JCS telegram to State (Link)

31st TFW (64 x F-100)
474
th TFW (42 x F-100)
401
st TFW (56 x F-100)
CCTW (17 x F-100)
482
nd FIS (36 x F-102)

MacDill AFB status 25 October 1962 via JCS telegram to State (Link)

836 AEIV (95 x F-84F)
27
th TFW (60 x F-100)
363 TRW (28 x RF-101 and 18 x RB-66B)
622 ARS (20 x KB-50)

Shaw AFB status 25 October 1962 via JCS telegram to State (Link)

363 TRW (6 x WB-66C)

McCoy AFB status 25 October 1962 via JCS telegram to State (Link)

354 TFW (65 x F-100)
4
th TFW (65 x F-105)
996
th AEW (12 x RC-121)
4505 ARW (20 x KB-50)

Patrick AFB status 25 October 1962 via JCS telegram to State (Link)

48th FIS (24 x F-106)

Cuban Military

75,000 (Standing Army)
100,000 (Ready Reserve – Mobilizable within a few hours)
100,000 (Home Guard – Local and Rear Area Security only)
160~ T-34/T-54 tanks
60 x MiG-17s and -19s
700+ AA Guns

Group of Soviet Forces in Cuba

74th Independent Motorized Rifle Regiment (OMSP) - San Cristobal and Guanajay area

3 x Motorized Rifle Battalions
1 x Tank Battalion (31 x T-55s or T-34-85s)
6 x 122mm Howitzers, 10 x 100mm SP Guns, 9 x 120mm Mortars
1 x Battalion of Lunas (2 x Launchers, 8 to 12 missiles with "special" warheads, and 102 men)

43rd Independent Motorized Rifle Regiment (OMSP) - vicinity of Santiago de las Vegas

3 x Motorized Rifle Battalions
1 x Tank Battalion (31 x T-55s or T-34-85s)
6 x 122mm Howitzers, 10 x 100mm SP Guns, 9 x 120mm Mortars
1 x Battalion of Lunas (2 x Launchers, 8 to 12 missiles each with "special" warheads, and 102 men)

146th Independent Motorized Rifle Regiment (OMSP) - Camajuani, Placetas, Sulu

3 x Motorized Rifle Battalions
1 x Tank Battalion (31 x T-55s or T-34-85s)
6 x 122mm Howitzers, 10 x 100mm SP Guns, 9 x 120mm Mortars
1 x Battalion of Lunas (2 x Launchers, 8 to 12 missiles each with "special" warheads, and 102 men)

106th Independent Motorized Rifle Regiment (OMSP) - vicinity of Holguin

3 x Rifle Battalions
1 x Tank Battalion (31 x T-55s or T-34-85s)

12th PVO Division (72 SA-2 Launchers plus 288 missiles) - Western Cuba

27th PVO Division (72 SA-2 Launchers plus 288 missiles) - Eastern Cuba

32nd Fighter Aviation Regiment (42 x MiG 21F-13 FISHBED Cs)

36 x Il-28 Beagles (Conventionally armed)

6 x Il-28 Beagles (Nuclear Armed; provided with six 407N devices - 12 kt)

Missile Division (Name not known at this time)

539th Missile Regiment (8 x SS-4) - West Cuba
546th Missile Regiment (8 x SS-4) - West Cuba
564th Missile Regiment (8 x SS-5) - West Cuba
514th Missile Regiment (8 x SS-4) - Central Cuba
657th Missile Regiment (8 x SS-5) - Central Cuba

231st Independent Aviation Engineering Regiment (OAIP) - Western Cuba

(8 Launchers and 40 x 4K87 Sopka (SSC-2a) Tactical Cruise Missiles - 90 mile range, 12 kt warhead)

222nd Independent Aviation Engineering Regiment (OAIP) - Eastern Cuba

(8 Launchers and 40 x 4K87 Sopka (SSC-2a) Tactical Cruise Missiles - 90 mile range, 12 kt warhead)

12 x Komar Missile Boats

The US Plan to Hit Cuba

OPLAN 316 was set to go off on October 29th, if nobody negotiated an end to the crisis.

The plan was to launch three massive air strikes a day until Cuban air capacity was obliterated. The first strike was to involve 576 sorties. The second and third strikes for the first day brought the total sorties up to 1,190.

The first air strikes would hit the five missile launch sites, and 24 SA-2 sites by F-100s and F-105s; with F-104s flying MiG CAP.

USN and USMC aircraft would begin bombing the landing beaches and nearby objectives in western Cuba, near Tarana.

While this was all going on, the 82nd and 101st Airborne would parachute in onto the following targets, with each target being hit by at least a regiment:

Jos Marti airfield (near Havana)
Los Banos airfield
Mariel naval air station
Baracoa Airfield

As a final bonus, the Marine garrison at Gitmo would have assaulted out of it's perimeter, after being reinforced via MATS with 3,500 extra Marines.

The Really, Really, Really FINAL US Plan to Hit Cuba

Strategic Air Command had plans to destroy the SS-4 and SS-5 missile sites in case conventional bombardment didn't destroy them. In keeping with Curtis LeMay and Tommy Powers' ideas, the amount of force planned was truly massive - six B-47s each carrying two 10 to 20 megaton gravity bombs, were programmed to strike the missile sites, and not coincidentally, blow most of Cuba off the map, literally.

At sea, the USS Enterprise and Independence both had about 40~ nuclear devices in their magazines; but the cores for them were carried on the cruisers accompanying the carriers as a safety measure. If the order had been given to go ahead; the cores would be helicoptered over to the carriers, with the first devices becoming available 20-25 minutes from the time the order was given.